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CHRISTMAS KINO! (#69) // MONDAY 8TH DECEMBER

KINO 69 CHRISTMAS FLYER
As it’s December, that means that anything that happens on a monthly basis has to have a Christmas edition, and Kino is no exception.

To celebrate, we’re planning on getting all you lovely people sat in a room to watch a dozen or so random short films fresh from London’s filmmaking community. Yes, that is the same format as every month but hey, it works.

Oh, and this time we have Santa.

WANT TO SCREEN AT KINO #69?

As always, filmmakers register in advance to screen their short at each event, sight unseen. We don’t watch ANYTHING in advance, we simply ask that you book your film in with us beforehand and present it yourself on the night. There are no themes, no pre-selection and no restrictions, other than:

– films must be under 6 minutes
– films must be on DVD
– films must include the Kino logo + screening number (69) at the end, just for our screening
– the filmmaker must present the film in person

Screening slots are allocated on a first-come, first-served basis. If you’d like to screen your short drop us a line ASAP at screen@kinolondon.com

We’ll need your name, the title and duration of your film, along with your contact details.

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Kino’s Open-Mic Short Film Night (#69)
Monday 8th December
ELECTROWERKZ (AKA ISLINGTON METALWORKS)
7 Torrens Street, Angel, Islington EC1V 1NQ
Nearest tube: Angel
Doors at 7:30pm, films start 8:15pm
£4 entry, £3 with flyer (save some paper and get it on your phone)
Free Popcorn

Kino #68- Insurrection

15257367524_e7cee49e53_k    November’s Kino was a night of reckless insubordination. Trailers masqueraded as shorts. Suggestions for film challenges were too grotesque and inhumane to be read aloud. Bribes were made. Then, the final insult: Kino London’s Laura Shacham failed to put the Kino logo at the end of her film. Her penance? To make and screen ‘Dong Close Up’ (a suggestion inspired by Joanne Woolgar’s wonderful Gong Close Up, of which more below).

The films:

Maria Andrews- A Daughter Like You

Laith Sami- White Cane (trailer)

Molly Brown- A Visit to Child’s Hill

Joanne Woolgar- Gong Close Up

Donna Lipowitz-Cat Bath

Gaynor Perry- And Then it Dawned on Me

Laura Schacham- Penalty C (trailer)

Daniel L Barrett- Moletrap

Gozra Lozano- You’re Burning

Keif Gwinn- Immaculate

15257364674_628a6724fe_k
The night began with a startling excerpt from Maria Andrew’s documentary A Daughter Like You in which the Margot, the protagonist and narrator, recounted the brutalities, coincidences and unlikely friendships of her childhood in Auschwitz.  Laith Sami’s White Cane followed and was in fact revealed to be an indiegogo trailer for a short film dramatising the struggles of a blind ballerina. Thankfully Molly Brown’s comedic A Visit To Child’s Hill was characteristically enigmatic, depicting the economic disintegration which befell Finchley Road after the collapse of the elephant training market in 1870. Joanne Woolgar returned with another phenomenal short, Gong Close Up, which felt like a voyage across a hundred landscapes; from the craterous footage of a moon landing to the colours and textures of a gold leaf Byzantine painting. The textures and tensions writ large on the face of Tia the cat, star of Donna Lipowitz’s Cat Bath were no less enticing. Standing drenched in the bathtub, subjected to a shower by her loving owner, Tia was decidedly uncertain as to her response; her quizzical, equivocal expressions were a testimony to the complexities of the feline psyche.

We then found ourselves in the agrarian wonderland of Gaynor Perry’s music video And Then it Dawned on Me which featured a playful faerie aesthetic including a homespun crown of thistles and a wonderful papier mache pig-wolf mask. Kino’s own Laura Shacham screened the trailer for her forthcoming film exploring the social, political and religious context of the death penalty and its administration. Penalty C interrogates the classism, constitutive racial bias and potential illegality of the death penalty, as well as the moralistic, juridical and economic rationale invoked in its favour. Respite from the violence of the law was provided by Daniel L. Barrett’s Moletrap, which reconciled industrial technology and the natural world as trucks, steel gates and telephone wires almost seamlessly integrated themselves into the serenity of the Essex countryside. In contrast, Gozra Lozano’s music video You’re Burning was anything but sedate; desire was set ablaze in an extreme sensual showcase of lips, spikes and flames, and the once luminous electrical filament of a lightbulb which slowly disintegrated before our eyes. In the final screening, Sketch In Studios’ Immaculate, the realm of the imaginary crossed over into the real as we witnessed the murder of mime artist Monique Bordeaux, beaten to death by with an imaginary bat as her papier mache boyfriend watched from the audience, aghast.

 

Having rejected a handful of heretical suggestions for film challenges, the title for this month’s challenge is ‘He’s Only Been Dead Five Minutes’. Hope to see you next month for further cinematic transgressions.

Next Kino: Monday 8th December

WANT TO SCREEN AT KINO #69?

As always, filmmakers register in advance to screen their short at each event, sight unseen. We don’t watch ANYTHING in advance, we simply ask that you book your film in with us beforehand and present it yourself on the night. There are no themes, no pre-selection and no restrictions, other than:

– films must be under 6 minutes
– films must be on DVD
– films must include the Kino logo + screening number (69) at the end, just for our screening
– the filmmaker must present the film in person
 
Screening slots are allocated on a first-come, first-served basis. If you’d like to screen your short drop us a line ASAP at screen@kinolondon.com
 
We’ll need your name, the title and duration of your film, along with your contact details.